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The incident occurred on rue Paul-Cabet. Photo archives LBP
The incident occurred on rue Paul-Cabet. Photo archives LBP

January 1, 1970: a homemade bomb blows up a photo booth

Funny way to celebrate the New Year. As they returned from their New Year celebration on January 1, 1970, a group of young people saw a man drop a box in an automatic photo booth, rue Paul-Cabet in Dijon. Intrigued by the suspicious appearance of the package, they informed a peacekeeper who was returning home and the latter called the police station. The package explodes, however, before reinforcements arrive. Low intensity, the explosion did not hurt. However, the damage is estimated at 22 000 francs for the cabin and 1000 francs for the window of a nearby company. According to the investigators, the machine would be a homemade bomb, hidden in a shoebox.

June 19, 1970: he brings his jaguar on a leash to the prefecture

Photo archives LBP
Photo archives LBP

It was a strange surprise for the employees of the prefecture. In the early afternoon, Friday, June 19, 1970, it is indeed a jaguar that showed up in the building. Held on a leash by his master, Jacques Moiton, bodybuilder of Dijon and former cyclist, the animal of 3 years and 80 kilos made the employees tremble. His owner went to the prefecture to recover his license, which had been taken away for two months in April and which had not been returned quickly enough to his liking. Man and jaguar were expelled by the police, called on the scene.

Photo archives LBP
Photo archives LBP

January 31, 1971: The first female university president in France is elected in Dijon

Françoise Moret-Bailly, previously Dean of the Faculty of Sciences of Dijon, was elected on January 31, 1971 President of the University Council. She is the first woman in France to access such a function. The 36-year-old scholar was elected with a comfortable majority (40 out of 66 votes) by a board composed of teachers, students, researchers, technical and service staff and even outside personalities. 'university.

March 7, 1972: antisemitic dolls at the Carrefour store in Quetigny

"Jew, 23.50 F". Thus were labeled some dolls, alongside witches, devils and monkeys in a collection offered for sale in several Carrefour stores in France, including that of Quetigny. It is besides following a complaint of a customer of this store that a report of bailiff was drawn up and the dolls removed from the sale. Bishop Brousse, Bishop of Dijon at the time, had immediately insurgent and provided support to the Jewish community.

Photo archives LBP
Photo archives LBP

July 1972: Dijon becomes a pioneer in the field of electric vehicles

They are 21 to circulate in the streets of Dijon. Silent, odorless, they are electric cars built in collaboration with a Chevigny-Saint-Sauveur laboratory. Dijon was chosen to conduct an experiment. Made of plastic, they have a range of 50 to 70 kilometers and can go up to 30 km / h. No steering wheel or pedals are needed for their maneuver, just a central lever, which allows them to be driven with one hand. These vehicles are classified in the category of motorcycles from 50 to 125 cm³. Thus, it is enough to have a motorcycle license and a certificate of aptitudes specific, which one obtains in half an hour of driving with a monitor, to be able to handle them. These vehicles are available for rent by the hour, the day, the week or the month. It is also possible to buy one for 6 000 F, charger included. An investment quickly profitable, the electric car being, according to its manufacturers, 10 times less energy-consuming than an average car.

A few years later, in May 1974, Dijon again became famous in the field of vehicles of a new kind. Indeed, two buses, one electric, the other propelled by gas, were put into service in the city. An experiment was launched, with journeys linking the station to the theater. The electric bus could bring about fifty passengers with a range of about 100 km. The gas could take him twenty passengers for 250 km. Both vehicles were made available to the public free of charge.

June 26, 1973: Dijon-Sombernon, one of the few routes where we can exceed 100 km / h

Photo archives LBP
Photo archives LBP

The late 1960s and early 1970s were the scene of many changes in the Highway Code. In particular, speed limits are at the heart of the debate as the number of people killed continues to rise. While they did not exist until then, the restrictions were introduced for the first time by decree in 1962, after many experiments. The maximum speed allowed is 60 km / h in built-up areas.

In 1972, it was the turn of the off-urban roads to be concerned by the limited speed: 100 km / h maximum, except for motorways. Only a few journeys in France, on national roads, obtain a derogation. This is the case of the road linking Dijon to Sombernon. It is possible to drive at 130 km / h, on a path of 31 km. Only three other sections of road in France know the same regulation, while four other portions are applied a maximum speed of 120 km / h.

January 24, 1974, Darcy Square with the Porte Guillaume. Basically, the hotel La Cloche. Photo archives LBP
January 24, 1974, Darcy Square with the Porte Guillaume. Basically, the hotel La Cloche. Photo archives LBP

January 1974: when Dijon almost lost its Hotel de la Cloche

Emblematic of Dijon and Place Darcy, the Hotel de la Cloche as we know it could well have been a distant memory among the old Dijonnais. We are early 1974. Business is bad: 50% filling rate, attendance increasingly low. The owners of the Hotel de la Cloche can no longer follow and are forced to sell. In the wake is announced the demolition of the building, which sits there since 1880. In its place, there is a ten-storey building with a hotel with 160 rooms (against 220 previously), apartments, offices and parking.

Two associations of citizens go to the wall and launch a petition to defend the building. And they win. The roof and the facade are inscribed on the historic monuments on October 29, 1975. Two parts of the building have been remodeled, one in offices and the other in apartments. The new Hotel de la Cloche finally opens in 1982.

June 21, 1974: the Pink Floyd fire the exhibition grounds of Dijon (video made by a user from the photos taken at the time)

The juvenile district of Dijon prison in 1973. Photo archives LBP
The juvenile district of Dijon prison in 1973. Photo archives LBP

June 29, 1976: A 15-year-old Dijon prisoner for … a fight between teenagers

He was a young detainee who received the jail of Dijon June 29, 1976. At only 15 years old, a teenager was locked by a magistrate dijonnais for a fight between teenagers, five months later early.

We are in January. A fight breaks out between young people. One is injured in the knee, resulting in an eight-day disability. His father decides to take the case to court. As stated The public good At the time: "A complaint was then filed by his father who in the meantime administered such a severe correction to the person responsible for the injury that he had 16 days of incapacity … The medical certificates are there to prove it. "

Five months later, in June, the boy in question was surprised to be picked up by the gendarmes at the exit of the school bus. Presented before an examining magistrate, he claims that his opponent injured himself by falling. A version corroborated by a witness. This is not enough to convince the magistrate who plans to lead a confrontation. In the meantime, in order not to let the young man have contact with the outside world, he has him locked up at the prison. The teenager left in handcuffs under the eyes of his family. According to the law of the time, his detention could not however exceed ten days.

October 13, 1977: a native of Dijon receives the Nobel Prize for Medicine

Public domain photo
Public domain photo

This is the ultimate reward for a doctor: the 1977 Nobel Prize in Medicine was awarded to three researchers, including one born in Dijon. Roger Guillemin, born in 1924, grew up and studied in the capital of the dukes of Burgundy. Generalist at Saint-Seine-l'Abbaye for less than two years, he then became interested in endocrinology, of which he made his specialty. He flew to Canada, then, after a few years, continued his career in the United States. First in Texas, then in California. He received the Nobel Prize for his discoveries in the field of neurohormones, chemical messengers produced by neurons. He shared the award with Americans Andrew V. Schally and Rosalyn Yalow.

Robert Levavasseur, on his arrival at the courthouse. Photo archives LBP
Robert Levavasseur, on his arrival at the courthouse. Photo archives LBP

November 15, 1978: a Dijon industrialist imprisoned for having swindled nearly 50 million francs

It's a thunderclap in the world of Dijon. On November 15, 1978, Robert Levavasseur, high personality Dijon and industrial, is locked. He is accused of embezzlement that would have allowed him to divert nearly 50 million francs. Charged with fraud, breach of trust and aggravated breach of trust, the man was incarcerated at Dijon Prison. According to the financial section of the judicial police of Dijon, which conducted the investigations, Robert Levavasseur would have been responsible for offenses through two companies of which he was CEO. Quotations billed through fictitious companies would have allowed the manufacturer to double or even triple his percentage of fees on several contracts, including one concerning the construction of more than 1,000 pavilions in the Dijon area.

November 19, 1978: a sect of Poiseul-lès-Saulx attracts the attention of the national media

The Sons of Darkness sect settled in the old presbytery. Photo archives LBP
The Sons of Darkness sect settled in the old presbytery. Photo archives LBP

Established there for more than three years, the Sons of Darkness sect has been under the spotlight as a result of the dramatic events that caused the death of over 900 worshipers from the People's Temple sect in Guyana. The few faithful of Poiseul-lès-Saulx followed, it seems, a philosophy similar to the ewes of Reverend Jim Jones. Few (less than ten at this time, 18 at most before), the few young people installed in the old presbytery lived recluse and, according to the inhabitants of the village, never posed problem. They lived only money received from their family. Faced with the commotion caused by events, they left Côte-d'Or to settle in Haute-Loire. A move that they already planned for a long time.



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